Craving a giant bowl of Drunken Noodles? (me too!) Stir fried chiles, shallots, garlic and ginger tossed in a simple soy-based sauce with tender chicken and wide rice noodles. Although there is a bit of prep involved, once you start cooking this recipe comes together rather quickly. This recipe serves 4.

Drunken Noodles

Two words that best describe Drunken Noodles are spicy and addictive.

I’ve eat a lot of Thai. I love nothin more than hanging up my metaphorical apron and ordering take out. On his way home, Pat will usually pick it up from our favorite Thai place. We usually order either drunken noodles or pad thai. 

As you might know, I’ve made drunken noodles before. But I just so happened to have stumble upon a spectacular recipe online, that over the last year, I’ve slightly adapted to resemble our favorite Thai takeout places. 

Drunken Noodles

Spicy, addictive and delicious!

Ingredients for Drunken Noodles

To Make Drunken Noodles You Will Need:

  • rice noodles (I use wide noodles)
  • thin-cut boneless skinless chicken breasts
  • low-sodium soy sauce
  • extra light olive oil
  • cornstarch
  • brown sugar
  • dark soy sauce
  • oyster sauce
  • fish sauce
  • shallot
  • garlic
  • ginger paste
  • serrano chiles or jalapeños
  • green onions
  • thai basil or holy basil
  • shaoxing rice wine (chinese cooking wine)

soaking noodles

Place 10 ounces rice noodles in a metal bowl and cover with hot tap water. The metal bowl will conduct the heat and keep the water warmer longer. Soak wide rice noodles for 30 to 35 minutes or until soft. For thinner rice noodles, soak for 15 minutes or until soft. Once the noodles are soft, drain and set aside.

chicken ingredients

Next velvet the chicken for stir-frying. I did a little research on “velveting” and learned there are several different ways to do this. Essentially, velveting is a technique used in Chinese cooking where meat is marinated and precooked in oil. This yields tender, flavorful meat.

To Velvet Chicken You Will Need:

  • thin sliced chicken breast
  • water
  • extra light olive oil
  • low-sodium soy sauce
  • cornstarch

Add 1 pound thin sliced chicken breasts into a bowl. Add 2 tablespoons water and rub it into the chicken until the water disappears and is absorbed into the chicken. 

thinly sliced chicken, oil, soy sauce and cornstarch

Next, add in 1 teaspoons low-sodium soy sauce, 1 teaspoon extra light olive oil and 2 teaspoons cornstarch.

chicken ingredients combined

Toss well to combine and set off to the side.

brown sugar and water

Now make the drunken noodle sauce. First, dissolve 1-1/2 teaspoons dark brown sugar with 1 tablespoon hot water. 

sauce for Drunken Noodles

Add the brown sugar mixture to a bowl or liquid measuring cup and add in 2 teaspoons low-sodium soy sauce, 1 tablespoon dark soy sauce, 2 teaspoons each oyster sauce and fish sauce and a pinch or two of ground white pepper. Whisk well to combine and set off to the side.

oil in pan

Heat a large wok or chefs pan over medium-high to high heat until near smoking. Drizzle 2 tablespoons extra light olive oil around the inside perimeter.

sear chicken

Add in the marinated chicken and sear on each side.

seared chicken

Cooking for 1 to 2 minutes. Once golden, transfer to a clean plate and set off to the side.

shallots, garlic and ginger paste to pan

Add the remaining oil and add in 1 medium thinly sliced shallot, 3 cloves sliced garlic and 1/2 teaspoon of grated fresh ginger.

stirfried shallots, garlic and ginger

Stir fry for 20 to 30 seconds, tossing often.

adding serrano, julienned green onion, thai basil to pan

Then to that, add in 1 to 3 quartered Serrano chiles (or sub with jalapeños or thai chiles), 2 green onions that were cut into 3-inch pieces and julienned and 3/4 to 1 cup thai or holy basil. 1 is mild and 3 is spicy.

What’s a Good Substitute for Thai or Holy Basil?

There really isn’t a perfect substitute for either of these herbs. Obviously it’s always best to try to cook with authentic ingredients. Where I live, it’s rare to find thai or holy basil year round. During summer months, I grow thai basil in my herb garden for this exact reason. However, in the colder months, I use a 1/2 cup each italian basil and fresh mint and I think it works nicely.

stir fried peppers, onion and thai basil

Stir fry for another 30 seconds.

add the rice noodles to pan

Add in the (drained) soaked rice noodles.

toss noodles with stir-fried veggies

Toss using two wooden spatulas, using a scoop and toss sort of method.

pour in sauce

Pour in all of the sauce you made earlier.

toss

Toss well to coat.

add chicken and toss until heated

Lastly add in the chicken and 2 teaspoons Chinese cooking wine (I use shaoxing).

Drunken Noodles

Heat through and serve immediately.

Drunken Noodles

Serve in bowls with extra thai basil and serrano chiles (if you dare). And even more delicious with an ice cold beer(s).

Drunken Noodles

Enjoy! And if you give this Drunken Noodles with Chicken recipe a try, let me know! Snap a photo and tag me on twitter or instagram!

Drunken Noodles

Drunken Noodles
Yield: Serves 4

Drunken Noodles with Chicken

Craving a giant bowl of Drunken Noodles? (me too!) Stir fried chiles, shallots, garlic and ginger tossed in a simple soy-based sauce with tender chicken and wide rice noodles. Although there is a bit of prep involved, once you start cooking this recipe comes together rather quickly.

Prep Time 25 minutes
Total Time 25 minutes

Ingredients

FOR THE CHICKEN:

  • 1 pound thin cut chicken, sliced
  • 2 tablespoons water
  • 1 teaspoon soy sauce
  • 1 teaspoon light olive oil
  • 2 teaspoons cornstarch

FOR THE SAUCE:

  • 1 and 1/2 teaspoons dark brown sugar
  • 1 tablespoons water
  • 2 teaspoons low-sodium soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoons dark soy sauce
  • 2 teaspoons fish sauce
  • 2 teaspoons oyster sauce

FOR THE STIR FRY:

  • 10 ounces rice noodles
  • 3 tablespoon extra light olive oil
  • 3 cloves sliced (peeled) garlic
  • 1/2 teaspoon grated fresh ginger
  • 1/3 cup sliced shallot
  • 2 green onions, 3-inch pieces julienned
  • 1 cup thai or holy basil, lightly packed (see notes for substitution)
  • 2 teaspoons Chinese wine (I use Shaoxing)
  • 1 to 3 serrano chiles (or jalapeños or thai chiles)

Instructions

    PREPARE THE NOODLES:

    1. Place 10 ounces rice noodles in a metal bowl and cover with hot tap water. The metal bowl will conduct the heat and keep the water warmer longer. Soak wide rice noodles for 30 to 35 minutes or until soft. For thinner rice noodles, soak for 15 minutes or until soft. Once the noodles are soft, drain and set aside.

    PREPARE THE CHICKEN:

    1. Add 1 pound thin sliced chicken breasts into a bowl. Add the water and rub it into the chicken until the water disappears and is absorbed into the chicken. Next, add in low-sodium soy sauce, olive oil and cornstarch.

    PREPARE THE SAUCE:

    1. Dissolve dark brown sugar with hot water. Then add in low-sodium soy sauce, dark soy sauce, oyster sauce, fish sauce and a pinch or two of ground white pepper. Whisk well to combine and set off to the side.

    PREPARE THE STIR-FRY:

    1. Heat a large wok or chefs pan over medium-high to high heat until near smoking. Drizzle 2 tablespoons extra light olive oil around the inside perimeter. Add in the marinated chicken and sear on each side for 1 to 2 minutes. Once golden, transfer to a clean plate and set off to the side.
    2. Add the remaining oil and add in the shallot, sliced garlic and grated fresh ginger. Stir fry for 20 to 30 seconds, tossing often.
    3. Then to that, add in the chiles, green onions and 3/4 to 1 cup thai or holy basil. Stir fry for another 30 seconds.
    4. Add in the (drained) soaked rice noodles. Toss using two wooden spatulas, using a scoop and toss sort of method.
    5. Pour in all of the sauce you made earlier. Toss well to coat.
    6. Lastly add in the chicken and 2 teaspoons Chinese cooking wine (I use shaoxing). Heat through and serve immediately.
    7. Serve in bowls with extra thai basil and serrano chiles (if you dare).

Notes

WHAT’S A GOOD SUBSTITUTE FOR THAI OR HOLY BASIL?

There really isn’t a perfect substitute for either of these herbs. Obviously it’s always best to try to cook with authentic ingredients. Where I live, it’s rare to find thai or holy basil year round. During summer months, I grow thai basil in my herb garden for this exact reason. However, in the colder months, I use a 1/2 cup each italian basil and fresh mint and I think it works nicely.



Nutrition Information:

Yield:

4

Serving Size:

1

Amount Per Serving: Calories: 470Total Fat: 27gSaturated Fat: 6gTrans Fat: 0gUnsaturated Fat: 19gCholesterol: 107mgSodium: 801mgCarbohydrates: 26gFiber: 3gSugar: 3gProtein: 31g

ll information presented on this site is intended for informational purposes only. I am not a certified nutritionist and any nutritional information shared on SimplyScratch.com should only be used as a general guideline.

Respectfully adapted from Woks of Life.